Wednesday, September 15, 2004

Thank You!

As usual, Daniel Drezner says aloud what I've been thinking privately, that is, that all the SBVT and typewriter font and Bush National Guard service reports and all that crap are not the slightest bit relevant in this election. Can the media (and blogosphere) at least PRETEND there are issues being debated here?

Presumably, this sort of media fatigue is helping contribute to Mr. Drezner's 60% probability of voting for Sen. Kerry for President and Barack Obama for Senator (Of course, Alan Keyes opposition to to direct elections of senators might also have something to do with it).

2 comments:

skb said...

I think it is presumptuous of one to tell everyone else what is and is not relevant in this election. I am a straight married male but I think if I were a gay man, gay issues would be high on my list of what was relevant in this election. I admit that not being gay, the issue is not.

I fought in Vietnam during the Tet Offense and I would not vote for the President if I knew that he bribed someone or lied to get in the TANG. I would not vote for Sen. Kerry if I knew he lied about combat injuries to get a Purple Heart or lied about there being hostile fire when there was none in order to receive a medal. Feel free to think me silly.

ASecurityMom said...

I can't believe you would not see the relevance of Rathergate. This is about what makes for good evidence. As a debater, surely you don't want your opponents to be rewarded for arguing thusly: We say it is so. Our evidence says it is so. Our evidence that says it is so is flawed (fraud/fraudulent). Because we believe it to be so, you should accept our fraudulent evidence as valid and trustworthy because we say it supports what we say is so. Therefore, what we say to be so, regardless of the validity of the evidence we present to support what we say, is indeed so. And, any evidence you present to debunk our evidence is invalid because we believe what we say to be so. Therefore, we win the argument.

GET REAL! If you dismiss the Rathergate controversy as just not relevent, then you can certainly kiss goodbye any valid debate techniques/strategies that any future ethical debater might use either in the realm of government or collegiate competition.